British/NATO Vehicles

AFVs

FV 4201 Chieftain

The FV 4201 Chieftain was the main battle tank of the United Kingdom during the 1960s and 1970s. It was one of the most advanced tanks of its era, and at the time of its introduction in 1966 had the most powerful main gun and heaviest armour of any tank in the world. The Chieftain also introduced a supine (lying backwards) driver position, enabling a heavily sloped hull with reduced height.
The Chieftain was a radical evolutionary development of the successful Centurion line of tanks that had emerged at the end of the Second World War. The British had learned during the war that their tanks often lacked sufficient protection and firepower compared to those fielded by the enemy, and that this had led to high casualty levels when faced with the superior German tanks in World War II.
Leyland, who had been involved in Centurion, had built their own prototypes of a new tank design in 1956, and these led to a War Office specification for a new tank. The design was accepted in the early 1960s. Chieftain was designed to be as well protected as possible and to be equipped with a powerful 120 mm rifled cannon. The heavy armour came at the price of reduced mobility, chiefly due to engine power limitations, which was perhaps the Chieftain's main drawback. The engine selected took the multi-fuel route and as introduced gave less than the planned output; improvements to the engine did not increase power to the desired value.

Chieftain Mk III

In service: 1966-1995
Used by: Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, UK.
Price: £25.00



Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked) Family

The Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked) -or CVR(T)- is a family of armoured fighting vehicles in service with the British Army and others throughout the world.
The CVR(T) family includes light reconnaissance tanks, armoured personnel carriers, and engineering vehicles. They share a common engine, transmission and running gear but have different bodies depending on role. More than 3,000 CVR(T)s were manufactured by Alvis Vickers.

FV101 Scorpion

The FV101 Scorpion is a British light tank, part of the Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked) or, CVR(T) family. The full design name is Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked) Fire Support (Scorpion). Manufactured by Alvis Vickers it was introduced into service with the British Army in 1973 and served until 1994. More than 3,000 were produced. It is also one of the fastest tanks in the world, along with pre-WWII BT series.

FV101 Scorpion

In service: 1966-1995
Used by: Belgium, Botswana, Brunei, Chile, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Jordan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Oman, Philippines, Spain, Thailand, Venezuela, UK.
Price: £15.00



FV102 Striker

FV102 Striker is the Swingfire wire guided anti-tank missile carrying member of the CVR(T) family. Five missiles are in a ready to fire bin at the back of the vehicle and five reloads are carried. The bin is elevated to 35°(622mils) for firing. The targeting sight can be demounted and operated at a distance from the vehicle which can remain in cover, even completely screened as the missile can turn up to 90 degrees after launch to come onto the target heading. The missiles have hollow charge warheads and were originally steered by joystick control i.e. Manual Command to Line of Sight (MCLOS), later updated to the Semi-Automatic Command to Line of Sight (SACLOS) system where the controller merely sights the target.

FV102 Striker

In service: 1966-1995
Used by: UK
Price: £15.00



FV105 Sultan

FV105 Sultan is a British Army command and control vehicle based on the CVR(T) platform. It has a higher roof than the APC variants, providing a more comfortable "office space" inside. This contains a large vertical map board and desk along one side, with a bench seat for three people facing it. Forward of this are positions for the radio operator with provision for four radios and vehicle commander, whose seat can be raised which also gave his access to the pintal mounted G.P.M.G. The driver sits forward of this in a small compartment beside the engine space, on a chair with a spring-loaded seat that allows him to recline inside the vehicle or sit upright with his head out of the hatch.
The back of the vehicle is designed to be extended by an attached tent to form a briefing area. The map board can be removed from the vehicle and hung from the tent poles, along with overhead lights connected to the Sultan's power supply. However, this option has been removed from many vehicles in service.
In common with the other CVR(T) vehicles, the Sultan was originally fitted with a canvas skirt for river crossing. Because of its high roof this was needed only at the front which slopes downwards. The swimming skirt has been permanently removed from all CVR(T) vehicles in the British Army.
The Sultan contains an NBC filter pack for protection against chemical gas, biological agents and radioactive particles.

FV105 Sultan

In service: 1966-1995
Used by: UK
Price: £15.00



FV107 Scimitar

FV107 Scimitar is an armoured reconnaissance vehicle (sometimes classed as a light tank) used by the British Army. It is very similar to the FV101 Scorpion but mounts a high velocity 30 mm L21 RARDEN cannon instead of a 76 mm cannon. It was issued to Royal Armoured Corps, Armoured Regiments in the Reconnaissance role. Each Regiment had a Close Reconnaissance Squadron of 5 Troops of 8 FV107 Scimitar.

FV107 Scimitar

In service: 1966-1995
Used by: Belgium, UK.
Price: £15.00



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